Ubuntu is better with WINE

It’s been a couple of years since I made the jump to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS as my primary operating system, thanks in no small part to Windows 10 updates and BODs.

It all started when I loaded my Toshiba Satellite L70D laptop with an SSD and Ubuntu to try to extend its usable lifetime. To give you an idea how old it is, the laptop shipped with Windows 8.1 on it, and I bought it because it was one of the few 17″ laptops still available at the time.  I would have bought a 17″ Macbook Pro after my 15″ died, but it seemed Apple

and other manufacturer’s were no longer making 17″ laptops.  Now you can find numerous 17″ PC laptops aimed at the gaming market.  Anyway, the laptop ran well and I discovered I could run VMs using VirtualBox reliably.  I had been using VMWare Fusion before, and had tried earlier versions of VirtualBox with no success.

I had been looking for a lean OS on which to run numerous VMs.  I was considering OS/X, but there is definitely a cost premium for the hardware, and the choices available are more limited than the clone market.  I even thought about a Hackintosh but didn’t really want to explore EULA violations and support issues for updates.

After discovering all the major software I was using had Ubuntu supported versions, I decided to take the jump and load it on my new (at the time) desktop.  While I ran into a few VirtualBox issues along the way I have never lost any data so far, and would have to say that my experience rivals the commercial VM software I have used.  I’ve also had no hardware support issues like I had experienced previously when trying out Linux distros.

Linux seems to have matured enough that even a noob with a little Googling can find the solution to any issue or question I have had thus far.  Of course I chose Ubuntu because it is one of the largest distros, so it’s a relatively safe choice, but other distros I played with seemed just as viable.

Recently I wanted to see if a personal VCL project would run natively under Ubuntu.  I was contemplating making an FMX version just to have it natively on Linux without using a VM.  The app uses a dynamic plug-in architecture with run-time packages.  It is based on code I originally received from Mark Miller; the author of Coderush for Delphi and DevExpress’ Coderush for .NET.  The project also uses Firebird 3.0 embedded, and the VirtualTreeView in grid mode, since it’s open source and lightning fast.

I tried CrossVCL’s VTreeView demo only to find out that it is indeed a work in progress.  It’s VTreeView support has some painting issues and run-time exceptions were thrown so I knew I needed to find another way to get my VCL app onto Ubuntu without using VirtualBox.  The other night I thought I would see if I could get it to work under WINE.  I installed Q4Wine from the Ubuntu software app, and added my application EXE with the default settings.  Much to my surprise, it fired right up.  I even managed to make an Ubuntu shortcut and add it to my favorites.

CompositeApp running on Ubuntu 18.04LTS with WINE

One Response to “Ubuntu is better with WINE”

  1. Jeff Says:

    BODs? Haven’t seen one on Windows 10 ever.

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